Creating CSS3 Media Queries

This article shares relevant data on CSS3 Media Queries, what it is about, how to create it, and how to conveniently test it.

Today, there are a myriad of applications and programming languages aiming to better our experience with the pages we browse online. Coding is not just confined within the dictates of a degree-holder code developer. Over time, it has been simplified and its techniques have grown ubiquitous, giving equal opportunities for aspiring amateurs. CSS3 is utilized to specify the visual properties of a certain presentation. Here we can define the color, border radius, multiple background images, text shadows, multi-column layout, etc. Because of CSS3 media queries, a certain webpage is already capable of detailing media types such as print or screen, even screen sizes.

Various code structures exist for a variety of device sizes and screens. Today, there is a lot of preference over the type of screen used and its sizes by which viewers study a certain data. These can be in LCDs, big screen displays, desktops, laptops, tablets and mobile phones. If the rendering of a certain code for a specific screen and screen size is diverse, a lot of multiple versions must be created to cater to the vast differences of screens in the market. The language of CSS3 will enable ease in creating these specifics.

Before one commences on coding, it is important to note the following specifications or capabilities of a device: height and width of the browser and device, portrait or landscape orientation of the device and screen resolution. It is also important to determine if your web browser supports CSS3 media queries.

Maximum Width

The following CSS will be appropriate if the screening area is lesser than 500px.

@media screen and (max-width: 500px) {

.class {background: #ffff;}

}

 

Minimum Width

The following CSS will be appropriate if the screening area is larger than 500px.

@media screen and (min-width: 500px) {

.class {background: #ffff;}

}

 

Multiple Media Queries

You can merge various media queries. The next code will be appropriate if the screening area is between 400px and 600px.

@media screen and (min-width: 400px) and (max-width: 600px) {

.class {

background: #ffff;}

}

 

Device Width

The following code will be appropriate if the maximum-device-width is 480px. The max-device-width signifies the definite resolution of the gadget and max-width denotes the screening area resolution.

@media screen and (max-device-width: 480px) {

.class {

background: #ffff;}

}

 

Testing The Code Conveniently

Being able to finish a code to reflect CSS3 media queries in the page your working is not enough. You must test it to see if it works in the device, whether it is compatible with the device’s specification and if the output merits the intentions you have set beforehand. ProtoFluid, an application website, allows you to render a page as if being screened in the device of concern.